Spring 2023

Pandemics and Society: The Socio-Ecological Construction of Infectious Diseases throughout History

Listed in: Anthropology and Sociology, as SOCI-306  |  Environmental Studies, as ENST-306

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Li Zhang (Section 01)

Description

(Offered as SOCI-306 and ENST-306) How and why do pandemics emerge? How have pandemics been shaped by social and ecological conditions around the world? And how do pandemics in turn transform society and our environment? This is a research-oriented interdisciplinary seminar examining how epidemic infectious diseases are not naturally given but socially and environmentally constructed. We will study the plague (including the Black Death), smallpox, dengue, malaria, cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, HIV, SARS, MERS, and COVID-19, and draw upon examples from all around the world throughout history. Special attention is given to environmental change and modernization, science and technology, state-making and globalization, migration and geopolitics, as well as class, race/ethnicity and gender inequalities. The seminar will draw on readings in sociology, anthropology, history, geography, public health, biology, epidemiology, political ecology, and other interdisciplinary fields. Lectures will be accompanied by discussion, and students will be required to undertake independent research, write a final essay, and present their work to the class. We will explore the possibility of publishing final essays as a collection.

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Zhang.

How to handle overenrollment: SOCI majors first, followed by ANTH and ENST majors, then class year (seniors, Juniors, etc), then Five College students

Students who enroll in this course will likely encounter and be expected to engage in the following intellectual skills, modes of learning, and assessment: an emphasis on readings, discussion, independent research, and writing.

Offerings

2022-23: Offered in Spring 2023