Spring 2021

Law's Classifications (Research Seminar)

Listed in: Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought, as LJST-346

Faculty

Michaela J. Brangan (Section 01)

Description

(Research Seminar)  When courts decide cases, they engage in knowledge production, and so must use logical, enforceable classifications to distinguish among persons, things, and rights. Legal doctrines that enshrine these classifications may conflict with broader commitments to equality or tradition, even as they help remedy past injuries, protect existing rights, or create durable guidelines for the future. Such conflicts come into full view when these doctrines leave the courtroom and collide with other social forces and frameworks, like market rationality, medical science, political movements, or religious beliefs. How does law create its classifications? How do race, gender, class and other social identities intersect with them? What external taxonomies are invoked in their making, and to what ends? By attending to the ways law’s classifications are developed, used, resisted or changed, we will come to see the law’s internal tensions, its civic limits, and its social power.

Limited to 15 students. Spring semester. Visiting Assistant Professor Brangan.

If Overenrolled: Priority given to LJST Majors

Keywords

Attention to Issues of Class, Attention to Issues of Gender and Sexuality, Attention to Issues of Race, Attention to Issues of Social Justice, Attention to Research, Attention to Writing, Online Only

Offerings

2022-23: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023
Other years: Offered in Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022